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United States Department of Health and Human Services – Family and Youth Services Bureau Street Outreach Program Is your program seeking funding to provide street-based outreach and education for runaway or homeless youth? The Department of Health and Human Services Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) recently posted information about a forecasted funding opportunity with its Street Outreach Program (SOP). The SOP’s purpose is to provide prevention and intervention services for runaway or street youth or youth experiencing homelessness who either have been or are at risk for becoming victims of sexual abuse, exploitation, or trafficking. Let’s take a closer look at this forecasted opportunity, using information from the closed 2020 funding opportunity announcement from this past spring.

As a grant professional and GPC holder who has spent the majority of my career in youth development, I cannot help but consider how earning my GPC has shaped my ability to impact this sector. Sure, having a GPC raises ethical standards and increases knowledge and skill sets in key areas like research, project design, and writing to improve quality and efficiency, but what about a deeper level of impact? I truly believe having a GPC can significantly advance a grant professional’s ability to drive meaningful change, not only within their organizations but also within their broader sector. I have experienced this firsthand in my work with youth-serving organizations.

United States Department of Health and Human Services – Family and Youth Services Bureau Basic Center Program Is your program seeking funding for meeting the needs of runaway and homeless youth? The Department of Health and Human Services Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) recently posted information about a forecasted funding opportunity with its Basic Center Program (BCP). The BCP’s purpose is to provide temporary emergency shelter and counseling to youth who have left home without their caregivers’ permission, have been forced to leave their home, or are otherwise experiencing homelessness. Let’s take a closer look at this forecasted opportunity, using information from the 2019 funding opportunity announcement.

Grant professionals are oftentimes asked to address multiple questions which require an in-depth response but with limited word (or worse, character) counts. In my transition from a legal career to grant writing, this was, and still remains, one of the strongest skills I brought to the table. Consequently, law school also taught me how to whittle down content like nobody’s business but that’s for another day. There’s a fundamental formula every 1L (i.e. first-year law student) learns for approaching narrative questions, or as we referred to them in my law school days, hypotheticals (hypos for short). The C-R-A-C* methodology (conclusion, rule, analysis, conclusion) is taught as an organization tool for making an effective legal argument. As a grant professional, I use a simplified version of this method to construct my narratives. For our purposes today, we’ll be focusing on applying these strategies to the ‘Need’ section of a proposal.

Institute of Museum and Library Services – National Leadership Grants for Museums Attention museum folks! Here’s another spotlight on the museum funding opportunities that are currently open. If your program is seeking to explore opportunities to improve the museum profession at a broad level, you might be interested in this solicitation. The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) recently opened applications for the National Leadership Grants (NLG) for Museums program to support projects that address pressing needs of the broader museum field, as well as projects that can advance practices and strengthen museum services. The mission of the IMLS is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. The agency accomplishes this through research, policy and development, and grantmaking opportunities such as the NLG program.

Lately, I have been thinking a lot about relationships. Perhaps it is all the talk of social distancing, self-quarantine, and isolation. As a seasoned grant professional working at my home office for more than ten years, I can honestly say this is the first time I have ever felt “alone.” One might wonder how I could feel lonely with my new “co-workers”; my once-quiet office is now interrupted by two kids, markers, paint, notepads, and maybe even yesterday’s fruit snacks stuck to my desk (don’t judge)! But I desperately miss face-to-face meetings with clients, board and committee meetings, and live trainings that provide valuable in-person adult time to connect and build or strengthen relationships.

Institute of Museum and Library Services – Museum Grants for African American History and Culture Attention museum folks – another opportunity for you this week! If your institution is an African American museum looking for capacity-building and/or staff professional development opportunities, you might be interested in this funding program. The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) recently opened applications for the Museum Grants for African American History and Culture (AAHC) program to nurture museum professionals, build institutional capacity, and increase access to museum and archival collections at African American museums and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The mission of the IMLS is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. The agency accomplishes this through research, policy and development, and grantmaking opportunities such as AAHC.

  Every grant proposal requires some type of budget. Unfortunately, some of us tend to put off this component for as long as we can. However, it should really be the starting point. When we write a proposal, it should be for the purpose of filling a gap in our budget, not just to get money for money’s sake. In a previous blog, Julie Alsup introduced the idea of braided funding. Here, I’ll walk you through the nuts and bolt of implementing this useful concept.

Institute of Museum and Library Services – Museums for America Attention museum folks! If your program is seeking funding to strengthen your museum’s capacity to serve the public, you might be interested in this opportunity. The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) recently opened applications for the Museums for America program grants to support lifelong learning, increase public access, and improve capacity.

Braided funding, supplanting, and leveraged funds are important concepts to understand for the purposes of effective grant planning (pre-award) and for successful grant management (post-award). Put simply, braided funding refers to the concept of using multiple funding streams to support the expenses of an organization, program, or project. Having more than one funding stream helps to minimize risk should one funding stream dry up. In addition, having one or more confirmed revenue source helps build confidence among other potential funders.