Grant 301: Relationships: It is a Two-Way Street Session 1 of the Grants 301 Series Sometimes it seems easier to avoid conflict and focus on the future.  This session will teach you how to appropriately engage with funders to overcome past missteps and/or prepare for the most...

    Grants 101: Relationships with Grant Funders Session 2 of the Grants 101 Series Beyond the Writing: How to cultivate and maintain meaningful relationships with grant funders Many agencies make the mistake of not treating grant funders as they do their major individual and/or corporate donors. This is understandable,...

  Federal Grants: Relationships with Program Officers and Legislators Session 3 of the Federal Grants Series Many development professionals are uncomfortable with federal grants because they don’t feel there are relationships to cultivate like there are with foundation grants. While each federal department is different, there are relationships...

It’s January. Are you ready for a reset? Better yet, is your grant strategy ready for a reset? I am just hunching here but with a year like 2020, I think the answer may be “yes” (and probably in many more ways than just grants)!  There are many different tools and tactics to reset your grant strategy.

While there are legal requirements for nonprofit organizations around transparency and disclosure of financial information, there can also be some grey areas where ethical decisions aren’t as clear. For instance, it can be tempting to apply for and accept funding anywhere you can get it. But what if you serve clients who are struggling with substance use, and a potential funder is known for contributing to the opioid crisis? If accepting money means you are straying from your mission, or if you have any doubt about the morality of doing business with a certain corporation, it may not be worth the financial benefit. Your goal should be to build funder relationships that you can stand behind and feel good about. Here, we are going to explore a few other ethical dilemmas you may run across when building relationships with funders.