Success Stories

The Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Association (ALSA) St. Louis Regional Chapter recently received a grant for $23,395 from the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation to support the Loan Closet Plus program. ALSA will identify persons with ALS in need of the new equipment through established channels of referral and evaluation. If there is no insurance coverage or the device is not insurance eligible, the person with ALS is able to access this equipment through the Loan Closet Plus program free of charge. ALSA returns the equipment to the loan closet when no longer needed in order to make it available for another individual’s use.

Mosaic Life Care Foundation (MLCF) was recently awarded a $100,000 grant from the Patterson Family Foundation to support a portion of the Phase II Capital costs for their Cancer Survivorship Clinic. Phase II, the 9,000 square-foot Cancer Survivorship Clinic will feature an array of professional services and comfort for patients and families. New additions include a multi-purpose education room; expanded therapy services; wellness and exercise gym; spiritual health services; massage, acupuncture, and acupressure treatment; and a patient library. The capital budget includes general construction supplies and equipment, as well as technology improvements to increase virtual service capabilities for rural residents.

Wichita Children’s Home (WCH) was recently awarded a $31,277 grant from the State Human Trafficking Victims’ Assistance Fund (Kansas) to focus on supporting the depth and breadth of Wichita Children’s Home’s survivor aftercare services for victims of human trafficking (HT). Our primary goal is to empower these young women to heal and achieve self-actualization.

Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired (CCVI) recently received a grant for $75,000 from the Sarli Family Foundation to sustain core services in 2022. This support will help CCVI meet the ever-present needs of children with visual impairments while recruiting and retaining the highly specialized staff required to deliver services. General support allows CCVI to focus our resources on key services to achieve the best possible outcomes for the children we serve, especially during this difficult time. CCVI teachers, therapists, and specialists will provide services for 275 infants and children in 2022 through the following core program areas:
  • The Early Intervention Program (EIP) offers an individualized educational/therapy program for infants and toddlers, birth through age three, who have significant visual impairments that impact learning. It provides home-based instruction, therapies, and center-based evaluations of developmental progress.
  • The Preschool/Kindergarten Program’s six classrooms combine curriculum with specialized therapies and activities to enhance basic skills while preparing children for inclusion in public or private elementary schools.
  • Outreach Services are provided for school-age children attending public, private, charter, parochial, and state schools that do not have certified teachers of the visually impaired and/or orientation and mobility instructors. Services include assessment and monitoring of functional visual development and training on specialized classroom equipment.
  • Parent/Family Support Programs offer educational and training opportunities for all families, including orientation and mobility training, health care navigation, and other workshops and social gatherings.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwestern Illinois (BBBSIL) recently received a grant for $20,000 from the Joseph H. & Florence A. Roblee Foundation to produce quality, lasting 1:1 mentoring relationships that keep kids in school, out of trouble, and on a path to post-graduation success. Funding will support the identification and recruitment of volunteers, enrollment and interviews of new youth and their families, and regular follow-ups with participants.

Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc. (IBT) was recently awarded a $25,000 grant from the Dwane L. and Velma Lunt Wallace Charitable Foundation to replace the fire suppression hood and venting in the kitchen at The K.I.D.S. Place early childhood center. The Wallace Foundation has been a dedicated supporter of IBT's mission to support diverse learners. (Read more about their past giving here: Wallace Foundation Funds Playground Accessibility).

Kansas City Friends of Alvin Ailey (KCFAA) was recently awarded a $39,593 grant from Jackson County COMBAT Violence Prevention. Funding will be utilized to support KCFAA’s signature program, which uses the arts coupled with an intensive personal development curriculum framework that includes the Oakland Men’s Project “How to Stop the Violence That Tears Our Lives Apart” curriculum, and creative writing classes.

Poetry for Personal Power (P3) recently received a grant for $100,000 from the Health Forward Foundation Mental Health Fund to support the Stars Among Us program. The Stars Among Us program will match 30-60 peers with a behavioral health peer support specialist for peer support and mentoring in the community. Each peer will receive 25 hours of one-on-one peer support from a trained peer; unlimited access to P3 peer workshops and groups; and access to P3’s trainings, resources, and events such as advocacy events, webinars, the peer information campus (PIC), and connection to community resources. Peer support, including connection and referrals to other community service providers that are part of the peers’ recovery plan, will aid in solving social determinants and will increase the likelihood of success in achieving mental health and substance use recovery milestones.