Grants 101 - Continued Grant Professional Development and Career Path Opportunities Session 12 of the Grants 101 Series For some people, grant writing is just a job. For others, it is a passion. In this course, Julie Assel, GPC presents information to individuals about career choices and professional credentialing...

    Grants 301: Becoming a Grant Reviewer Session 6 of the Grants 301 Series  A great way to learn how to write better grants is to become a grant reviewer. Grant reviewing can impact your understanding of funders, the grant-making process, and your community. This session will give...

  Federal Grants: Becoming a Federal Grant Reviewer Session 13 of the Federal Grants Series Did you know that most competitive federal grant opportunities are reviewed by a team of peer reviewers? Federal agencies are looking for specific, documented experience in areas related to current grant opportunities. Going...

  IHE Grant Series: Grants and Capital Campaigns at IHEs Session 5 of the IHE Starting an Office of Sponsored Research Series It is typical for colleges and universities to use multi-year comprehensive capital campaigns as major fundraising initiatives. Grants for bricks and mortar projects, program development, and capacity-building...

  IHE Grant Series - Aligning Grants to the Institution's Strategic Plan Session 4 of the IHE Starting an Office of Sponsored Research Series When an organization sets out to develop a new strategic plan, the grant professional can often be left out of important conversations and planning sessions....

When I was a kid, I loved Halloween. I loved dressing up and pretending to be someone else - someone that was better, stronger, and more capable than I felt I would ever be. Fast forward through the decades and I recognize there are times when I want to pretend to be someone else - someone who is better, stronger, and more capable than I sometimes feel. It wasn’t until a few years ago that I realized what I was feeling was imposter syndrome. During my tenure with the Grant Professionals Certification Institute board of directors, I started to see that many grant professionals feel the same way.

    Grants 301: Managing Up Session 5 of the Grants 301 Series One of the greatest challenges we face as grant professionals is getting the information and resources needed to craft project ideas and develop competitive proposals. This information is often spread across multiple people and departments…from finance to...

Starting Small and Dreaming Big: Developing Collaborative Grantsmanship at Small Universities Session 2 of the IHE Starting an Office of Sponsored Research Series Starting Small and Dreaming Big will offer key considerations and practical advice for developing a collaborative culture of grantsmanship at small to medium-sized organizations....

Building a Career as a Grant Professional in an Institution of Higher Education Session 1 of the IHE Starting an Office of Sponsored Research Series In Building a Career as a Grant Professional in an Institution of Higher Education, the presenter will describe her personal career trajectory that...

I am a grant professional for whom the written word is a more comfortable form of communication than face-to-face communication. Once I understood the concepts and intent of grant proposal writing, I fell in love with it. The majority of my time is spent alone in my office writing or in one-on-one conversations with program, financial, and executive leadership staff. Given that my learning style is also visual text, reading RFPs, gathering the information needed, and conducting the research is all easy for me to understand. Recently though, I have needed to be involved in meetings with program officers. These are not my favorite activity. Oh, I love hearing all the things funders have to say about their organization that help me better understand their mission. I also love to hear all the things about the program that my organizations say to the funder that I have not heard before in quite the same way. (Haven’t we all been here?) If my only task was to listen, these meetings would be easy, but these were conversations in which I was the lead for a significant portion of the conversation.