Grants 301: Logic Models and Theory of Change Session 4 of the Grants 301 Series While traditional philanthropy focused on funding immediate needs and short-term goals, the practice of philanthropy is taking a turn towards social change. Funders desire to fund change, not charity. In this way, philanthropy...

  Grants 201: Logic Models for Program Planning Session 5 of the Grants 201 Series You don’t have to love them, but you do have to respect them because logic models are a dynamic tool for program planning, evaluation planning, monitoring, and coalition building. Many funders require them, and...

    Grants 101: Evaluation and Logic Models Session 6 of the Grants 101 Series Almost all grant funders ask what effect a program will have on the participants and how the organization knows of a program’s success. This session will teach the development professionals who write grants methods for...

    Ethics: The Ethics of Program Design: Plans and Partners Session 5 of the Ethics Series Creating a high-quality grant proposal can be challenging when organizations may also be designing the program at the same time. Alignment to the mission of the organization and its strategic plan versus...

  Grants 101 - Describing the Key Components of Your Program Session 5 of the Grants 101 Series A common mistake of many grant proposals is not providing enough information for the funder to truly understand the program. This session will guide attendees on what key program...

As grant professionals, we all know that one way to boost our proposals is to include collaboration. Funders like to see partnerships for a number of reasons. But too often, the partnerships we include might not be very substantive. Maybe we worked together on one event or they refer a few clients to our organization. But funders emphasize collaboration for good reason and it might be time to truly give those partnerships a chance to GROW! So, how do you go about helping your partnerships blossom? Begin by taking stock of all of your current partners, big or small. Partners could include other nonprofit organizations, funders, businesses, or individuals. Assess the ways in which you currently partner and begin thinking outside of the box to explore other ways in which both parties could benefit from expanded collaboration. One way the levels of partnership are often framed is through the 3C Model, which came from the for-profit sector. Its tiers include cooperation, coordination, and collaboration (moving from simple to complex). Here are a few ideas of ways to expand from surface-level partnership to meaningful relationships that benefit everyone involved:

    Ethics: Ethics for Grant Proposal Need Statements Session 4 of the Ethics Series The way grant professionals describe the needs of their community is an important part of persuading reviewers and grant funders to award a grant. Which need is greatest and most aligned to the funders’...

  Grant 301: Motivational Interviewing: A Grant Centered Approach Session 2 of the Grants 301 Series Have you ever been stuck when writing a grant proposal because the program person you're talking to says, "Oh, but we can't...

    Grants 101: Describing the Need Session 4 of the Grants 101 Series In every grant proposal, the writer must convey the importance and urgency of their target population’s needs, problems, and challenges with data and heart. In this webinar, presenter Julie Assel, GPC, and Jennifer Murphy, GPC, start at...

  Federal Grants: Managing the Development of a Federal Grant Proposal Session 5 of the Federal Grants Series Many nonprofits are not successful with federal grants because they do not have the time or expertise to run effective project design meetings. This causes proposals to become rushed at...