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We live in a world where, as consumers, we can purchase literally anything with a quick search and a few clicks. The rise of online shopping and next-day delivery has made it easier than ever to go on a shopping splurge without seriously weighing the costs and benefits of the newest gadget or the impact it will have on our personal finances. When a grant is awarded to an organization, the program staff may enthusiastically load up their online shopping carts with everything outlined in the grant budget. There is certainly a time and place for efficient procurement of approved supplies and services. In fact, federal law requires grantees minimize the time elapsing between the receipt of grant funds and the payment for allowable expenditures (2 CFR 200.305(b)). It is important for program staff to quickly implement the grant award, and typically, this means doing a little shopping.

National Endowment for the Humanities – Office of Digital Humanities Attention humanities folks with an upcoming digital project! If your program is seeking funding for an innovative, experimental, or challenging digital project – whether in the early start-up phase, sustainability phase, or anywhere in between – you might be interested in this opportunity. The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) recently opened applications for the Digital Humanities Advancement Grants (DHAG) to support scholarly research, exploration of methodologies, development of software/technology, and other digital projects that enhance scholarship, teaching, and public programming in the humanities.

It’s normal and often encouraged to seek multiple funding opportunities for a single program, often referred to as braided funding (see Braiding Funds without Getting Tied Up In Knots – Approaching Budgets with Pre-Award and Post-Award In Mind by Julie Alsup, GPC). You might even request more funds than you need to run a program with the expectation that one or more proposals will fall through. As nonprofit organizations that belong to and are supported by the public, we should always be looking for new funding streams in case an existing source should dry up. But what if you ask for more than you need, and all the funders decide you shall receive?

United States Department of Health and Human Services – Health Resources and Services Administration Does your organization work to address substance use disorder in rural communities? The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently posted information about a forecasted funding opportunity with its Rural Communities Opioid Response Program (RCORP). RCORP is a multi-year initiative that focuses on reducing the morbidity and mortality of substance use disorder (SUD) and opioid use disorder (OUD) in rural communities. This particular opportunity focuses on RCORP-Implementation grants. Let’s take a closer look at this forecasted grant program, using information from the (closed) funding opportunity announcement from an earlier 2020 cycle.

United States Department of Health and Human Services – Family and Youth Services Bureau Street Outreach Program Is your program seeking funding to provide street-based outreach and education for runaway or homeless youth? The Department of Health and Human Services Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) recently posted information about a forecasted funding opportunity with its Street Outreach Program (SOP). The SOP’s purpose is to provide prevention and intervention services for runaway or street youth or youth experiencing homelessness who either have been or are at risk for becoming victims of sexual abuse, exploitation, or trafficking. Let’s take a closer look at this forecasted opportunity, using information from the closed 2020 funding opportunity announcement from this past spring.

As a grant professional and GPC holder who has spent the majority of my career in youth development, I cannot help but consider how earning my GPC has shaped my ability to impact this sector. Sure, having a GPC raises ethical standards and increases knowledge and skill sets in key areas like research, project design, and writing to improve quality and efficiency, but what about a deeper level of impact? I truly believe having a GPC can significantly advance a grant professional’s ability to drive meaningful change, not only within their organizations but also within their broader sector. I have experienced this firsthand in my work with youth-serving organizations.

United States Department of Health and Human Services – Family and Youth Services Bureau Basic Center Program Is your program seeking funding for meeting the needs of runaway and homeless youth? The Department of Health and Human Services Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) recently posted information about a forecasted funding opportunity with its Basic Center Program (BCP). The BCP’s purpose is to provide temporary emergency shelter and counseling to youth who have left home without their caregivers’ permission, have been forced to leave their home, or are otherwise experiencing homelessness. Let’s take a closer look at this forecasted opportunity, using information from the 2019 funding opportunity announcement.

Institute of Museum and Library Services – National Leadership Grants for Museums Attention museum folks! Here’s another spotlight on the museum funding opportunities that are currently open. If your program is seeking to explore opportunities to improve the museum profession at a broad level, you might be interested in this solicitation. The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) recently opened applications for the National Leadership Grants (NLG) for Museums program to support projects that address pressing needs of the broader museum field, as well as projects that can advance practices and strengthen museum services. The mission of the IMLS is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. The agency accomplishes this through research, policy and development, and grantmaking opportunities such as the NLG program.

Lately, I have been thinking a lot about relationships. Perhaps it is all the talk of social distancing, self-quarantine, and isolation. As a seasoned grant professional working at my home office for more than ten years, I can honestly say this is the first time I have ever felt “alone.” One might wonder how I could feel lonely with my new “co-workers”; my once-quiet office is now interrupted by two kids, markers, paint, notepads, and maybe even yesterday’s fruit snacks stuck to my desk (don’t judge)! But I desperately miss face-to-face meetings with clients, board and committee meetings, and live trainings that provide valuable in-person adult time to connect and build or strengthen relationships.

Institute of Museum and Library Services – Museum Grants for African American History and Culture Attention museum folks – another opportunity for you this week! If your institution is an African American museum looking for capacity-building and/or staff professional development opportunities, you might be interested in this funding program. The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) recently opened applications for the Museum Grants for African American History and Culture (AAHC) program to nurture museum professionals, build institutional capacity, and increase access to museum and archival collections at African American museums and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The mission of the IMLS is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. The agency accomplishes this through research, policy and development, and grantmaking opportunities such as AAHC.