Emily Hampton, GPC

Grant proposals consist of a variety of components depending on each grant’s requirements. Most require some form of a budget, whether that is a simple project budget or a complex organizational budget, or both. Some will also include a budget narrative or justification and any number of other attachments. But in any grant proposal, the narrative is where you will likely spend most of your time. Fortunately, the proposal’s narrative is the fun part! This is where you get to put your storytelling skills to work. So how do you get started? Much like an author would begin a novel, start with an outline.

The USDA’s Community Food Projects grant has been around since the 1990s and is renewed as part of the Farm Bill every five years. The purpose of the grant is to increase the food security of low-income communities which unfortunately continues to be a salient need across the country. Food is one of our basic needs. Many organizations work hard to feed the growing number of people who struggle to put food on the table every day. Whether in a rural or urban landscape, people often must make choices between paying rent or medical bills and buying food. Children are disproportionately affected by hunger, and the COVID-19 crisis has not only caused loss of income for many families. With school closures, kids can no longer count on free or reduced lunches every day.