Grant 301: Relationships: It is a Two-Way Street Session 1 of the Grants 301 Series Sometimes it seems easier to avoid conflict and focus on the future.  This session will teach you how to appropriately engage with funders to overcome past missteps and/or prepare for the most...

  Federal Grants: Relationships with Program Officers and Legislators Session 3 of the Federal Grants Series Many development professionals are uncomfortable with federal grants because they don’t feel there are relationships to cultivate like there are with foundation grants. While each federal department is different, there are relationships...

    Federal Grants: Federal Find and Fit Session 2 of the Federal Grants Series Applying for federal grants can be daunting. Between the broad and changing range of federal funding and making sure that what you do find is actually a good match for your organization, it’s easy...

    Ethics: Grant Ethics for Prospect Research and Funder Relationships Session 2 of the Ethics Series Have you ever been uncomfortable applying to a foundation which didn’t seem to really match your organization’s profile? Many nonprofit professionals are pressured into writing to foundations who don’t match their giving...

We live in a world where, as consumers, we can purchase literally anything with a quick search and a few clicks. The rise of online shopping and next-day delivery has made it easier than ever to go on a shopping splurge without seriously weighing the costs and benefits of the newest gadget or the impact it will have on our personal finances. When a grant is awarded to an organization, the program staff may enthusiastically load up their online shopping carts with everything outlined in the grant budget. There is certainly a time and place for efficient procurement of approved supplies and services. In fact, federal law requires grantees minimize the time elapsing between the receipt of grant funds and the payment for allowable expenditures (2 CFR 200.305(b)). It is important for program staff to quickly implement the grant award, and typically, this means doing a little shopping.

    Federal Grants: Pursuing Federal Grants Session 1 of the Federal Grants Series Applying for federal grants can - to put it mildly - be daunting. In this training, we make it easier by guiding participants through the major components, the key similarities and differences between foundation and...

  Grants 101: Researching Grant Opportunities Session 1 of the Grants 101 Series Identifying grant-funding sources for your organization requires tedious research. This session will teach you where to find appropriate corporate and family foundation resources and what key details to collect whether you are using a free...

  The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently opened applications for its Rural Cooperative Development Grant. USDA opportunities such as this can often be incredibly impactful – if not transformative – for rural communities. Let’s take a closer look at the details for this program by answering some key questions. What is the Rural Cooperative Development Grant? The Rural Cooperative Development Grant (RCDG) is intended to improve the economic condition of rural areas by assisting in the startup, expansion, or operational improvement of rural cooperatives and other business entities. Cooperatives are essential to the U.S. economy and are particularly critical to the health of rural communities. Cooperatives not only help farmers and ranchers market their products, but they can also supply rural residents with important services such as electricity, telecommunications, financial services, housing, food, and building materials.